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Half of old traditional brick kilns close from Sept 1

Air pollution

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PATNA: Half of the brick-kilns in the state were forced to close down from September 1. These brick-kilns did not adopt the new technology (jig-jag) within the August 31 deadline given by the state government. After which the Pollution Control Board took action and closed them.

Chairman of Bihar State Pollution Control Board, Dr Ashok Kumar Ghosh said that 6 thousand brick-kilns were being operated in the state using old traditional technology. The owners of these brick-kilns were asked many times to adopt the new jig-jag technique instead of the traditional technique.

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Even after being advised several times, they were given an ultimatum to adopt new technology by August 31, but they did not adopt the new technology. He said that even after the deadline ended on August 31, only 3 thousand brick-kiln owners adopted the new technique among the 6 thousand operating in the state. The pollution control board took action on the three thousand brick-kilns which were using the traditional technique and forced them to close down from September 1, he said and informed that 75 percent of brick-kilns in Patna district have adopted the new technology.

Ghosh said that there are a total of 150 brick-kilns in Patna district, out of which 100 have converted their kilns into new jig-jag techniques instead of old traditional techniques.

Ghosh said that most of the brick-kilns in Patna district are on the banks of the Ganges. Ganga water along with the environment was being contaminated by old technology. The new technology will reduce the side effects on the Ganges environment.

The BSPCB had issued a directive to the brick kiln enterprises in the state to upgrade to cleaner technologies. During the first one and half years, about 1500 kilns (20-25% of the total kilns in the state) have upgraded, and most of them opted for zigzag brick kiln technology. Initial experience showed that there were variations in the designs of zigzag kilns – mostly being adopted from the neighbouring states of Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. This also resulted in variations in the kiln performances, and the need for a standard design of zigzag kilns to suit the specific requirement of Bihar was expressed by the brick industry.

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